MSc and Diploma Award Requirements

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Awards

The programme conforms to the University’s Taught Assessment Regulations.

www.ed.ac.uk/academic-services/policies-regulations/regulations/assessment

www.ed.ac.uk/files/atoms/files/taughtassessmentregulations.pdf

Please refer to:

  • Regulation 44 Borderlines
  • Regulation 56 Postgraduate assessment progression
  • Regulation 57 Postgraduate degree, diploma and certificate award
  • Regulation 59 Award of postgraduate merit
  • Regulation 60 Award of postgraduate distinction

Here are regulations 56 & 57 pasted below:

Regulation 56

Postgraduate assessment progression

For programmes where there is an identifiable taught component followed by a project or dissertation component, students must pass the assessment requirements of the taught stage at an appropriate level at the first attempt before progression to the dissertation. In order to progress to the masters dissertation students must:
(a) pass at least 80 credits with a mark of at least 50% in each of the courses which make up these credits; and
(b) attain an average of at least 50% for the 120 credits of study examined at the point of decision for progression; and
(c) satisfy any other specific requirements for the masters degree programme, that are clearly stated in respective programme handbooks.
When all the marks for the taught components of the programme (120 credits) are available, if the student has achieved PASS marks in at least 80 credits and has an overall average of 40% or more over the full 120 credits, then they will be awarded credits on aggregate for the failed courses.
For programmes where the taught and project or dissertation components are taken in parallel, or where there are not identifiable taught and project or dissertation components, the requirements for progression are determined at programme level, stated in the Programme Handbook.

 

Regulation 57

Postgraduate degree, diploma and certificate award

In order to be awarded the certificate students must:
  • (a) pass at least 40 credits with a mark of at least 40%; and
  • (b) attain an average of at least 40% for the 60 credits of study examined for the certificate; and
  • (c) satisfy any other specific requirements for the named certificate that are clearly stated in respective programme handbooks.
In order to be awarded the diploma students must:
(a) pass at least 80 credits with a mark of at least 40%; and
(b) attain an average of at least 40% for the 120 credits of study examined for the diploma; and
(c) satisfy any other specific requirements for the named diploma that are clearly stated in respective programme handbooks.
In order to be awarded a masters degree students must:
(a) have satisfied any requirements for progression, as laid out in taught assessment regulation 56 above, and
(b) attain an additional 60 credits, by achieving a mark of at least 50% for the
dissertation or project component (if the programme has a dissertation or project element)
and
(c) satisfy any other specific requirements for the masters degree programme, that are clearly stated in respective Programme Handbooks.
When all the marks for the taught components of the programme or diploma are available, if the student has achieved PASS marks in at least 80 credits and has an overall average of 40% or more over the full 120 credits, then they will be awarded credits on aggregate for the failed courses, up to a maximum of 40 credits.
For a certificate, a maximum of 20 credits may be awarded on aggregate.

Borderline Criteria for Progression

Where a student is borderline for progression, the case will be considered by the Board of Examiners. The decision whether or not to allow progression in such cases is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

Borderline marks are defined as marks from two percentage points below the boundary for progression, up to the boundary itself, i.e. 48.00% to 49.99%.

Where applicable, factors taken into account in such cases will be (a) any special circumstances, such as illness or other adverse personal circumstances, which have been brought to the attention of the Board of Examiners; (b) credit weighting of individual courses; (c) the range of overall course marks; (d) marks and letter grades awarded to learning outcomes.

 

Borderline Criteria for Award – including with Merit

Where a student is borderline for award including award with Merit, the case will be considered by the Board of Examiners. The decision regarding classification of degree in such cases is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

Borderline marks are defined as marks from two percentage points below the boundary for award, up to the boundary itself, i.e. 48.00% to 49.99% and 58.00% to 59.99%

Where applicable, factors taken into account in such cases will be (a) any special circumstances, such as illness or other adverse personal circumstances, which have been brought to the attention of the Board of Examiners; (b) performance in final project / dissertation; (c) credit weighting of individual courses; (d) the range of overall course marks including dissertation / final project; (e) marks and letter grades awarded to learning outcomes.

 

Borderline Criteria for Distinction

Where a student does not qualify for a distinction as of right, they may be considered for the award of distinction if (a) their dissertation mark and (b) their credit-weighted average mark across all taught courses are both 68.00% or higher. The decision whether or not to award a distinction in such cases is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners. In exercising its discretion, the Board will take into account the following factors: (a) the student’s credit-weighted average across the degree as a whole; (b) the number of courses (including the dissertation) in which the student received a grade of A, and the credit weighting of those courses; (c) any special circumstances, such as illness or other adverse personal circumstances, which have been brought to the Board’s attention.

 

Academic appeals

An academic appeal is a request for a decision made by a Board of Examiners to be reconsidered in relation to:

  • marks
  • progression
  • degree award

If you are considering lodging an appeal, it is important that you act promptly. It is important to note that the appeal process cannot be used to challenge academic judgement. That is, a student cannot submit an appeal simply because they believe that they deserve a better mark.

There are specific and fairly narrow grounds under which an academic appeal may be submitted.

www.ed.ac.uk/academic-services/staff/appeals