Workshops

Creative Documentation
Dave House
30 Jan 9:10-11am
| 6 March 9:10-11am

Subverting, developing and expanding on traditional approaches to documentation covering subject matter, approaches and methodology. Creative sound recording techniques will be shown in detail here, but they can also be applied to photography and video. Bring your cameras, microphones and mobile phones along for this as well as a laptop if you have one.

Understanding objects – full details, click here
Eleni-Ira Panourgia
30 Jan 2-4pm | 6 March 2-4pm

In this workshop, we will explore ideas of ‘objects’ as subjects or elements of an artwork/design. We will investigate the making of objects and how they might operate in different dimensions and materials such as physical/digital 3D objects and sounds

Audio analysis and synthesis in supercollider click for full info
Marcin Pietrewsewski
1 Feb Jan 3-5pm | 6 March 3-5pm

We will be looking at different ways sound synthesis can be enhanced through processes of auditory feature analysis, and how the means of computational listening, data extraction and mapping can affect the design of interactive audio (and visual) systems.

Atomic Autographs – LiDAR Scanning  full details, click here
Asad Kahn
13 Feb 1-3pm | 13 March 1-3pm

This workshop presents the methods, procedures, and operations of a non-human eye, creatively appropriating and instrumentalising a machine vision for a novel post-perspectival and post-anthropocentric archival scenography. We will engage with a remote-sensing method, via Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), to archive and represent a world beyond the phenomenal. LiDAR uses an infrared pulse of light to measure ranges and forms an extremely accurate digital archive called a point-cloud. Through this procedure we will be challenging the artistic protocols of archiving that are firmly shaped around the centrality of vision of the human subject. The workshop aims to understand, how do we infiltrate and inhabit an archival space, achieved through a non-human eye? How can we uncover the shadows, the glitches, the fallacies in the archive and subvert the realism of their representation? How can we design a scenography for the predatory dehumanising gaze of the post-human eye to archive? How can we perform forensics on archives retrieved through such a process?

3D interpretations full details, click here

Roxanna Karam
13 Feb 2-4pm | 13 March 2-4pm

In these two workshops we will work with your projects’ material in terms of choreographing a narrative for your submission. We will critically analyse a diverse range of communications through staging your concepts and ideas as you develop them. The aim is to understand various creative ways of spatially exhibiting your ideas and effectively communicating them with your audience. We work on these two questions of what is your message and how you wish to express and exhibit it.

Networks – full details, click here
Jack Walker
13 Feb 3-5pm | 13 March 3-5pm

Throughout the Digital Media Studio Project, you will be shown a fascinating range of technology that you can use to develop your group project. Whilst there is enormous potential in the processes, techniques and workflows that you will engage with, it is easy to get lost in these complex networks of unexplored tools. It doesn’t have to be this way. My workshops will teach skills for integrating new technologies into your art and design work, alongside strategies for managing this complexity through time. We will explore ways in which technological experimentation can be used to strengthen the conceptual and practical trajectories of your work, and uncover agile frameworks that can be applied to the planning, maintenance and delivery of digital media projects. Crucially, we will discuss your project as an interactive network of people, tools and places. This ecosystem becomes our design focus, as we identify ways of introducing positive change to this socio-technological environment.

Introduction to Machine Listening in SuperCollider

  1. SuperCollider Basics

SuperCollider is not a single program. It is a system three programs:

  • sclang – the SuperCollider programming language. Consist of Functions, network, midi, patterns, timing, clocks and other type of control code including graphics and GUI. The language is used as a sort of a score or control of the music system you are creating. The code written in sclang is normally run directly (live coded), or loaded via .scd document files or as .sc Class files.
  • scserver – SuperCollider synthesis server (Server). It runs synths that consist of unit generators like oscillators, filters, math operations etc. Server also have functionality like busses, buffers, plugins, groups. The Code is written as a synthdefs (in sclang above) or as plugins (in c). The server is controlled via a well defined OSC protocol.
  • side – the code text editor and an integrated development environment (IDE). IDE is used for code editing, formatting, help files access and browsing etc.

You can choose to use all or only some of the above. For example, only use scserver and control it from Processing – see www.youtube.com/watch?v=0af9NupBQS0. and vimeo.com/108881498. You can use Haskel (TidalCyclestidalcycles.org/index.php/Welcome) or Python (FoxDot – foxdot.org/) instead of sclang, and Emacs or Vim text editors instead of scide. The typical scenario, However, is that you run all three programs scide, sclang and scserver together on one computer as a SuperCollider.app.

There are many ways to do the same thing within SuperCollider.
Code in SuperCollider can look very different but still do exactly the same thing (eg., Ndef, {}.play, SynthDef, node message style). There are many local systems (Extensions and Quarks) written within SuperCollider by users, often to help or solve some specific problem. Depending on preference, habit or optimisation, you may choose one way of working over another. All systems have their pros and cons. In the standard sclang there at least three common ways how to code and start a synth (SynthDef/Synth, {}.play, Ndef) and lots of ways how to set up a sequencer (schedule on a clock, Routine, Pbind, Tdef etc).

Here is a quick overview and comparison:

Copy all and run line-by-line in scide – editor

//this starts the synthesis server (global variable 's' is //reserved for Server
s.boot;

// {}.play vs synthdef vs ndef

// simple sine oscillator with an argument for frequency 
//global variable 'a' is used to hold synthesis definition 
a = {arg freq = 400; SinOsc.ar(freq, 0, 0.1)}.play;
//you can access/change 'freq' value using .set method
a.set(\freq, 300);
a.set(\freq, 440);
a.set(\freq, 1800);
//to stop evaluate 
a.free;
//or run cmd + .

Above approach is short and quick – both to write and evaluate new ideas. Although, it has a disadvantage – you have to stop the sound and create new instance (definition) to change anything. You can not create multiple instances of it and control is restricted only to predefined arguments (eg., freq). One way to deal with these problems is to use a SynthDef. A SynthDef is a language side representation of a synthesis graph – in short a synth definition.

//assuming that Server is still running, evaluate following code
//this is a SynthDef called \sine which consist of 
//a definition for sine oscillator with controllable frequency //argument ('freq') and specified Output.   

(
SynthDef(\sine, {
	arg freq = 400; //an argument
	var sig;  //a variable, local only within SynthDef
	
	sig = SinOsc.ar(freq, 0, 0.1);  
	
	//output
	Out.ar(0, sig);
	
}).add;
);

//assign variable 'a' to our Synth \sine
a = Synth(\sine);
a.set(\freq, 300);
a.free;
b = Synth(\sine);
Synth(\sine, [\freq, 800]);
Synth(\sine, [\freq, 700]);
Synth(\sine, [\freq, 600]);
Synth(\sine, [\freq, 500]);
Synth(\sine, [\freq, 100]);

//to stop run cmd + .

Synthdef pros: great for creating many of the same synth objects.
Synthdef cons: you have to stop the sound, redefine and re-instantiate new to change anything. Defining a Synthdef requires more typing, and you have to store it in a variable to access and control later. Similarly to {}.play example Synthdef requires arguments (‘arg’) to control it. These issues are addressed with a third example an Ndef.

//if your Server is not running, evaluate
s.boot; //or cmd + b (on mac)

//define an Ndef with sine oscillator
Ndef(\sine, {SinOsc.ar(400)});
//play it 
Ndef(\sine).play;
//change Ndef definition while sound is playing
Ndef(\sine, {SinOsc.ar(800)}); //just a different frequency 
Ndef(\sine, {LFSaw.ar(315)}); //swap the oscillator function

//add an argument
Ndef(\sine, {arg freq = 400; SinOsc.ar(freq)});
\\acts the same as two previous examples
Ndef(\sine).set(\freq, 456);

//stop
Ndef(\sine).stop;
//or run cmd + .

Ndef has an advantage over two previous examples, it allows to change an active process on run time without need to stop in between iterations. It can be controlled and accessed later by referring to its name. An Ndef can be swapped with fadeTime option.

Few useful functions:

s //by default this variable points to the local server
s.meter; // or cmd+m - opens audio monitor
s.scope; // opens stethoscope
//if your Server is not running, evaluate
s.boot; //or cmd + b (on mac)

Ndef(\first).play(fadeTime: 5); //start playing 5sec fadein
Ndef(\first).fadeTime= 3; //set crossfade time
Ndef(\first, {LFSaw.ar(400, 0, 0.2)});
Ndef(\first, {WhiteNoise.ar(0.15)});
Ndef(\first).stop(fadeTime: 5); //stop playing 5sec fadeout

//  The fadeTime for play and stop are not the same as the
//  crossfade time set with fadeTime= ...

Ndef(\second, {SinOsc.ar(500, 0, 0.5)});
Ndef(\second).play;
Ndef(\second).stop;
Ndef(\second, {Pulse.ar(600, 0.5, 0.5)});
Ndef(\second).play;
Ndef(\second).stop;

//Ndefs can be nested in other Ndefs
//notice that we only call .play on Ndef(\third)
Ndef(\third, {LPF.ar(Ndef.ar(\second))});
Ndef(\third).play;
Ndef(\third, {BPF.ar(Ndef.ar(\second), 500, 0.1)});
Ndef(\third).stop;

//more nesting with Ndef
Ndef(\noise, {WhiteNoise.ar(0.5)});
Ndef(\filter, {LPF.ar(Ndef.ar(\noise), 600)});
Ndef(\filter).play;
Ndef(\filter).fadeTime= 5;
Ndef(\filter, {LPF.ar(Ndef.ar(\noise), 300)});
Ndef(\filter).stop;

//simple frequency modulation (FM)
Ndef(\fm, {SinOsc.ar(Ndef.ar(\ctrl)*400, 0, 0.1)});
Ndef(\fm).play;
Ndef(\ctrl, {SinOsc.ar(2)});
Ndef(\ctrl).fadeTime= 5;

// Amplitude Modulation (AM) with replaceable modulator
// and settable fadeTime.

Ndef(\am, {SinOsc.ar(500, 0, Ndef.ar(\ctrl))});
Ndef(\am).play;
Ndef(\ctrl, {SinOsc.ar(5)});
Ndef(\ctrl).fadeTime= 10;
Ndef(\ctrl, {SinOsc.ar(2)});
Ndef(\ctrl, 0);
Ndef(\ctrl, {SoundIn.ar}); //uses mic input as amp control
Ndef(\chaos, {LFNoise0.ar(4)});
Ndef(\ctrl, {Ndef.ar(\chaos)});

//stop
Ndef(\am).stop;

Now, try to build something yourself. Let Ndef ‘xxx’ read MouseX movement and Ndef ‘yyy’ be pulsating noise…

Ndef(\xxx, {MouseX.kr(0, 4)});
Ndef(\yyy, {PinkNoise.ar(SinOsc.ar(Ndef.ar(\xxx)))});
Ndef(\yyy).play;

//check what rates are these Ndefs
Ndef(\xxx).rate;
Ndef(\yyy).rate;

Ndef extended example

Ndef(\pad).play

Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( Saw.ar([400, 500, 404, 660], 1 ))})
Ndef(\pad).fadeTime= 3
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( Saw.ar(2, 1 ))})
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( BLowPass4.ar( Saw.ar([404, 505, 606, 707], 4), 2000, 0.8))})

//  All detuned by same noise oscillator.
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( BLowPass4.ar( Saw.ar([404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1, 10), 4), 2000, 0.8))})

//  Individually detuned (by 4 noise oscillators).
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( BLowPass4.ar( Saw.ar([404+LFNoise2.ar(0.1, 10), 505+LFNoise2.ar(0.1, 10), 606+LFNoise2.ar(0.1, 10), 707+LFNoise2.ar(0.1, 10)], 4), 2000, 0.8))})

//  Same thing but written with shortcut code (!4).
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( BLowPass4.ar( Saw.ar([404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 30), 4), 2000, 0.8))})

//  Adding 4 noise oscillators for amplitude modulation.
Ndef(\pad, {Splay.ar( BLowPass4.ar( Saw.ar([404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 30), 4+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 0.1)), 2000, 0.8))})


//--refactoring the pad - indentation
(
Ndef(\pad, {
	Splay.ar(
		BLowPass4.ar(
			Saw.ar(
				[404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 30),
				4+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 0.1)
			),
			2000,//cutoff freq for filter
			0.8//q for filter
		)
	)
})
)

//--refactoring the pad - modularization
(
Ndef(\padFreqs, {[404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 30)});
Ndef(\padAmps, {4+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 0.1)});
Ndef(\pad, {
	Splay.ar(
		BLowPass4.ar(
			Saw.ar(
				Ndef.ar(\padFreqs),
				Ndef.ar(\padAmps)
			),
			2000,//cutoff freq for filter
			0.8//q for filter
		)
	)
});
)

//--improving the pad

//  Adding two more ndefs for the filter parameters.
(
Ndef(\padFreqs, {[404, 505, 606, 707]+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 30)});
Ndef(\padAmps, {4+LFNoise2.ar(0.1!4, 0.1)});
Ndef(\padCut, 2000);
Ndef(\padQ, 0.8);
Ndef(\pad, {
	Splay.ar(
		BLowPass4.ar(
			Saw.ar(
				Ndef.ar(\padFreqs),
				Ndef.ar(\padAmps)
			),
			Ndef.ar(\padCut),//cutoff freq for filter
			Ndef.ar(\padQ)//q for filter
		)
	)
});
)

Ndef(\padFreqs).fadeTime= 10
Ndef(\padFreqs, 500);
Ndef(\padFreqs, {SinOsc.ar(1)*10+500})
Ndef(\padFreqs, {SinOsc.ar([1, 1.1])*10+500})
Ndef(\padFreqs, {SinOsc.ar([1, 1.1, 1.2])*[10, 20, 30]+500})

Ndef(\padAmps).fadeTime= 2
Ndef(\padAmps, {0.5+LFNoise0.ar(1!4, 0.1)});

Ndef(\padFreqs, {LFSaw.ar([1, 1.1, 1.2])*[10, 20, 30, 44]+500})

Ndef(\padFreqs, {[404, 505, 606, 707, 808, 909, 1100, 3000]+LFNoise2.ar(30!14, 40)});

Ndef(\pad).stop(4)
  1. 2, 0.2, 0.2, 0.1
  2. 40, 520, 404, 640.4
  3. 2, 0.2, 0.2, 0.1
  4. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  5. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  6. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  7. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  8. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  9. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  10. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5
  11. 4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.5

Creative Documentation Notes 01

Creative Documentation – Workshop 1

Aims of workshop

  • What are your experiences of documentation? Your own projects / documentation you’ve seen of others work
    • Many (most?) artists and designers struggle with it, perhaps perceiving it as boring, unnecessary, extra work. It needn’t be so!
  • Workshop will consider:
    • What documentation is/can be
    • Alternative ways to document work
    • How to make documentation more integral and fun
    • How to take a creative approach that can be applied to any medium / equipment
    • How to treat documentation as part of your creative project, drawing inspiration from yours and others creative methodologies

What is documentation?

  • Broadly defined a document is ‘any physical or symbolic sign, preserved or recorded, intended to represent, to reconstruct, or to demonstrate a physical or conceptual phenomenon’. – Michael Buckland quoting Suzanne Briet (www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/29/documentation-and-the-information-of-art)
  • It is a record of work done
    • This is especially important for ephemeral work like installations, performances
    • If this is all that remains then bad documentation = a perception of bad work, plus lost opportunities / business.
  • Things to consider before starting your documenting process:
    • Who will experience it?
    • Where and how will it be presented?
    • What formats are appropriate?

How to document

  • There are many potential categories for what you can document, including but not limited to:
    • Visual: photo, video, drawing, sculpture, animation, colours representing moods, flow diagrams, maps…
    • Sonic: voices, environmental, composed, field recordings, interviews…
    • Curatorial: collecting/collating, saving items from meetings (eg coffee cups), discarded material (eg off-cuts from prototypes)…
    • Words: blogs, essays, social media, poems…
    • Any combination of the above!

What can/should you document?

  • Everything!…
  • Will you be ‘true’ or creative? Eg, re. sound recording – when does documentation become composition?
  • Traditional approaches
    • Chronological records of initial ideas, meeting minutes, experiments undertaken, making, exhibiting, reactions using blogs, videos, interviews, pinterest boards, photos…
  • How could you be more creative with your approach to documentation? What else could you document? How can you dig deeper?
    • Feelings/emotions
    • Senses: what you see, hear, smell, feel, taste
    • Environmental: weather, temperature, mood in room
    • Who’s there, who you meet, how people are connected, how you got there
    • Communiation between collaborators (eg a record of all WhatsApp messages sent, possibly performed or animated)
    • Tangenital: there are tangents and parallels to any story. For instance, you can take the history of a particular renaissance painting beyond the composition, lighting and date to consider the worldwide trade in paint pigments!
    • Number of coffees drunk, cigarettes smoked…
  • What practical things can you document?
    • What tools were used
    • People involved (age, gender, nationality, background)
    • Problems and failed experiments
  • With all this in mind – keep it contextual to your project. No gimmicks or quirky documentation for its own sake as this might undermine your message.

Tools available for documentation

  • Online: social media, Trello boards, slack channels…
  • Tech: cameras, field recorders, phones, GPS…
  • Anachronistic: deliberately using old/obsolete technology for a particular aesthetic effect: polaroids, LOMO, cinefilm, cassette tapes…
  • Physical: paper, pens…

Approaches to documenting something

Examples:

Here are two examples of projects I’ve worked on:

Practical task

  • In small groups, devise a mundane activity (your route to uni, who uses the stairwell…) and document it
  • Consider its nature: what kind of data does it lend itself to? How could you subvert that? What kind of equipment/skills do you have as a group? What message do you want to convey?
  • Devise a documentary plan (interviews, contact mics, photos etc) that sheds light on your activity / location
  • Gather documentary material which we will share & discuss how to use

3D interpretations

In these two workshops we will work with your projects’ material in terms of choreographing a narrative for your submission. We will critically analyse a diverse range of communications through staging your concepts and ideas as you develop them. The aim is to understand various creative ways of spatially exhibiting your ideas and effectively communicating them with your audience. We work on these two questions of what is your message and how you wish to express and exhibit it?

In the first part of the workshop I, I will present a selection of creative exhibition spaces and spatial data interpretations focusing on 3D geometries and surfaces, projection mapping and installations. In the second part of the workshop I, I will provide you with a range of basic 3D modelling and parametric design definitions for working with surfaces and simple geometries. We will discuss/sketch/brainstorm/ and make concept models.

In workshop II, we review the concept models (3D geometries and surfaces) from workshop I. We work on specific themes of your projects and develop a proposal on how you want to apply the explored techniques. We work on a short description/narrative on what you are expressing, why is it important and how you engage your audience as well as an installation plan (maximum 2 pages). We will also discuss the scale, material, structure and the realization of your final 3D geometries/surfaces.

For workshop I, book your place via: doodle.com/poll/32immpiq2ycmgdqb

For workshop II, book your place via: doodle.com/poll/ngmsgpsdffqa29kd

Requirements and preparation:

Think about the themes you would like to work with. Search for various exhibition and installation ideas online and save the ones you think are the most powerful and successful.  You are encouraged to work as a team for the workshops as you can bring different skills and strength to this creative process.

Please bring: laptops (or use computers available in the atrium), a notebook, camera, any model-making material you have, or you can provide (cardboards for example), model making basic material i.e. glue, scissors, etc. If you want to project any visuals, you can bring your own recordings or an example of what you think you can use if you want to develop a model for projection mapping.

Facilities you can get access to at the University:

A/V equipment: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/av/

Model workshops: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/model-workshops

Wood workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/wood-workshop

Metal workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/metal-workshop

Digital Fabrication workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/digital-fabrication

lass workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/glass-workshops

Casting room: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/foundry-and-casting-room

Please note that you need to undertake a special induction for each of the fabrication workshops above.

networks

Jack Walker

Throughout the Digital Media Studio Project, you will be shown a fascinating range of technology that you can use to develop your group project. Whilst there is enormous potential in the processes, techniques and workflows that you will engage with, it is easy to get lost in these complex networks of unexplored tools.

In the four years that I have been part of DMSP, as a student, audience member and project supervisor, I have noticed a number of participants (including myself) neglect the expressive components of their work in favour of technical glitz. The aesthetic, conceptual and interactive features of their design became less developed as groups were swept away by increasing technological complexity. The quality of creative work would generally suffer.

It doesn’t have to be this way. My workshops will teach skills for integrating new technologies into your art and design work, alongside strategies for managing this complexity through time. We will explore ways in which technological experimentation can be used to strengthen the conceptual and practical trajectories of your work, and uncover agile frameworks that can be applied to the planning, maintenance and delivery of digital media projects.

Crucially, we will discuss your project as an interactive network of people, tools and places. This ecosystem becomes our design focus, as we identify ways of introducing positive change to this socio-technological environment.

workshop one: mapping (click to book) will explore the parameters of your project. We will discuss the role that social organisation plays in the development of your work, and set out methods for identifying, testing and selecting specific technologies that you can integrate into this network. As we look towards your first DMSP submission, we will discuss how your early experiments and prototypes can be encapsulated and used to map out a future for your project.

workshop two: integration (click to book) will design a structure for your finished project. We will identify the various sub-components of your group’s organisation, and focus on how to connect these nodes together as you present your work to a public audience. This analysis will be mapped towards your second submission, as we critique methods for documenting the unique web of technological and social agencies that your group has created.

Both workshops will use my own research into blockchain, networks and sound as a primary case study, but will also focus on the specific requirements of each of your group projects. This way, we can unpick the unique technical requirements of each brief, as we assess how to overcome these challenges as your work develops in complexity. With this in mind, please bring examples or sketches of project work and drafts of your writing to each workshop (where possible). I will also be interested to hear the specific roles of the individuals in your group.

AUDIO ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS IN SUPERCOLLIDER

Book a slot at these workshops here: doodle.com/poll/wideqasyhfkciaat

The theme for this two-part workshop is AUDIO ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS IN SUPERCOLLIDER. We will be looking at different ways sound synthesis can be enhanced through processes of auditory feature analysis, and how the means of computational listening, data extraction and mapping can affect the design of interactive audio (and visual) systems.

Part One (1.02.2019) of the workshop will include a brief introduction to the SuperCollider Programming environment. We will look at basic syntax structure of the language, introduce principal Objects and Methods, chosen analysis algorithms (Pitch and Amplitude tracking, Onsets detection, Spectral analysis) and a set of synthesis models (additive, frequency modulation, granular). Several mapping strategies between analysis data and synthesis models will be introduced and demonstrated at the session. At the end of the first part of this workshop, you will be equipped with an extensive set of synthesis and analysis examples to start you off experimenting and to sketch ideas out.

Part Two (6.03.2019). During this session, we will focus on refining the designs from our first workshop and work on particular proposals, applications and problems you have encountered while experimenting with given examples. A set of themes to cover at this session may include – OSC communication (Supercollider and Unity, Supercollider and Processing etc.), integration of MIDI controllers and Human Interface Devices, parameter mapping with live input (microphone, instrument).

Understanding objects

Eleni-Ira Panourgia

30 Jan 2-4pm Sound Lab, Alison House – book a place

6 Mar 2-4pm Sound Lab, Alison House – book a place

Workshop 1

In this workshop, we will explore ideas of ‘objects’ as subjects or elements of an artwork/design. We will investigate the making of objects and how they might operate in different dimensions and materials such as physical/digital 3D objects and sounds. We will look at ways for interacting across spatial/physical and sonic, comparing and combining the qualities of two or more objects of different dimensions. We will also explore methods for developing the first (i.e. a space) based on the second (i.e. sound) and vice versa and how these are experienced simultaneously, by an audience.

As this workshop aims to bring together different art forms and disciplines, it would be good to have participants from various backgrounds (Music, Art, Design, Architecture). The desirable skills for the participants in this project are: sound design/production/synthesis/composition, making prototypes/3D modelling skills (virtual/digital and/or physical), bits of interaction design and programming.

Workshop resourcesclick here

Requirements and preparation:

  1. Think about what an ‘object’ signifies to you, what form could it take and how could it function within a work/environment. Develop one and bring it with you. Work according to your interests and practical skills. You are welcome to team up with your peers if you wish to explore multiple objects together. 
  2. Please bring: laptops (or use sound lab computers) to take notes, design in 2D, 3D or work with sound or edit/develop videos, video cameras or photographic cameras if you wish to use filming or photography as means for prototyping and for documenting your work (book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/), and/or mics/piezo/sound interfaces/zoom field recorders (book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/) if you wish to work with sound recordings, and/or physical material like clay, card, paper, glue, scissors, etc. if you wish to develop physical models.

Facilities:

A/V equipment: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/

Music Studios: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/music-studios – book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/

Model workshops: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/model-workshops

Wood workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/wood-workshop

Metal workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/metal-workshop

Digital Fabrication workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/digital-fabrication

Glass workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/glass-workshops

Casting room: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/foundry-and-casting-room

Please note that you need to undertake a special induction for each of the fabrication workshops above. You can email the technicians, call or drop by the workshop to find out when these are taking place. You can bring your own material or ask the technicians for information on how to order and purchase materials in each of the workshops.

Workshop 2

In this workshop, we will explore live and non-live forms of presenting ‘objects’ (for example, 2D/visuals, 3D, sounds). This will involve arranging objects in space, real or virtual, working with the resonance of objects and performing with objects, as well as using objects in interactive setups and in terms of audience participation.

As this workshop aims to bring together different art forms and disciplines, it would be good to have participants from various backgrounds (Music, Art, Design, Architecture). The desirable skills for the participants in this project are: sound design/production/synthesis/composition, making prototypes/3D modelling skills (virtual/digital and/or physical), bits of interaction design and programming.

Workshop resourcesclick here

Requirements and preparation:

  1. Design and develop objects – these can be for example, sounds in space, visuals and sounds in space, physical objects, installations or digital 3D objects within a physical or virtual environment. Work according to your interests and practical skills.
  2. Please bring your projects in-progress (or documentation of them) and any prototypes that you have developed so far. You are also suggested to bring: laptops (or use sound lab computers) to take notes, design in 2D, 3D or work with sound or edit/develop videos, video cameras or photographic cameras if you wish to use filming or photography as means for prototyping and for documenting your work (book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/), and/or mics/piezo/sound interfaces/zoom field recorders (book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/) if you wish to work with sound recordings or use mics as sensors, and/or physical material like clay, card, paper, glue, scissors, etc. if you wish to develop physical models.
  3. Any other equipment you are using for your projects and is not included in the above.

Facilities:

A/V equipment: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/

Music Studios: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/music-studios – book via: bookit.eca.ed.ac.uk/

Model workshops: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/model-workshops

Wood workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/wood-workshop

Metal workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/metal-workshop

Digital Fabrication workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/digital-fabrication

Glass workshop: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/glass-workshops

Casting room: www.eca.ed.ac.uk/facility/foundry-and-casting-room

Please note that you need to undertake a special induction for each of the fabrication workshops above. You can email the technicians, call or drop by the workshop to find out when these are taking place. You can bring your own material or ask the technicians for information on how to order and purchase materials in each of the workshops.

Atomic Autographs – LiDAR Scanning

Asad Kahn
13 Feb 1-3pm | 13 March 1-3pm

This workshop presents the methods, procedures, and operations of a non-human eye, creatively appropriating and instrumentalising a machine vision for a novel post-perspectival and post-anthropocentric archival scenography. We will engage with a remote-sensing method, via Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), to archive and represent a world beyond the phenomenal. LiDAR uses an infrared pulse of light to measure ranges and forms an extremely accurate digital archive called a point-cloud. Through this procedure we will be challenging the artistic protocols of archiving that are firmly shaped around the centrality of vision of the human subject. The workshop aims to understand, how do we infiltrate and inhabit an archival space, achieved through a non-human eye? How can we uncover the shadows, the glitches, the fallacies in the archive and subvert the realism of their representation? How can we design a scenography for the predatory dehumanising gaze of the post-human eye to archive? How can we perform forensics on archives retrieved through such a process?

NOTE ABOUT ACCESSING THE LIDAR SCANNER

The school has acquired a terrestrial LiDAR Scanner, Leica BLK 360 and it is available at the Ucreate Studio at the Main Library in George Square. You can write to ucreate.studio@ed.ac.uk to book for it. Ucreate Studio is run by Michael Boyd. Prior to booking, it is imperative he gives you an induction on the instrument. Here’s his email, mike.boyd@ed.ac.uk.

Note: You are not required to book the equipment for the workshops.

NOTE ABOUT SOFTWARE BEING USED ON THIS WORKSHOP

1. Autodesk Recap Pro 360
On the computational front, we will use the ‘Autodesk Recap Pro 360’ — a digital point cloud registering software that could be accessed for free using your .ed.ac.uk email-address and you could get a three-years educational license. You are required to download this onto your computer if you have one. Unfortunately, this software is only available for Windows operating units — however we will be using it to bridge the point-cloud from the LiDAR apparatus into our operating systems, to synthesise the point-cloud file and translate it into a universal file format. Which could thus ensure an ease of navigation between different software packages, such as Autodesk Maya, Autodesk 3D’s Max, SideFx Houdini, Unity, Unreal Engine and Cinema 4D.

2. CloudCompare

We will use be using Cloud-Compare, which is an open-source, three dimensional point cloud processing software to perform our computational and forensic procedures. You should be able to download it on both Mac and Windows operating units for free. We will be using it to subsample, edit, carve and craft, design, visualise and animate the point-cloud datasets.